Tag Archives: relaxing

Spring Break Plans

I’m soooo excited for Spring Break!! Just another 8 days of work, and then I get a magical 12 days off! 🙂 Linner is coming for part of my break, and I’ll be doing a bit of solo travel, too. Today I finalized my plans and I’m really looking forward to it!

When Linner arrives, we’ll have a quick staycation in Bangkok. The plan is to visit the Floating Market (new to us both), stay in a posh hotel downtown with a rooftop pool, get massages, and eat yummy Thai food. All in all, my kinda thing.

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Linner and I will travel to Krabi, Thailand and stay in Ao Nang at a sweet resort not too far from the beach. I plan to lay by the pool (hopefully I can get in, too!), relax with a pina colada or a fresh juice, and read. We’d also like to explore Ao Nang beach. Again, I hope to take a dip. Ao Nang has beautiful beaches, with huge rocks and cliffs nearby. I’d like to take a boat ride one day.


Once Linner leaves, I’ll be solo traveling to Indonesia! After a quick stop-over in Jakarta, I’ll fly to Ubud, Bali, where I will be staying at a relaxing hotel near the city. It has a pool with lounge chairs, a spa, and a good restaurant. The best part is it only cost me $34 a night, including breakfast! There’s a free area shuttle, and if I’m mobile and able to walk around, I plan on exploring. If not, I’ll lounge by the pool, reading and writing. Either way, it’ll be a relaxing trip!


This is why I live abroad…trips like this are possible and affordable. 🙂

The Little House in the Rice Fields

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The view from the terrace. I couldn’t get enough!

As you know, I’ve recently returned from a trip to Nepal. I was only there for five days, so I just stayed in and around Kathmandu, the nation’s capital. Kathmandu was alright. It was a busy city with lots going on and much to see, but I live in a big city with a lot happening, so I wanted to experience something a little different. I wanted to see what real Nepal was like. And I did just that…

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My taxi took me outside of town, past the noise, past the shops, past the chaos. We ended up driving down an old dirt road that wound around houses, up and down hills, past an orphanage. When the road was too bumpy for the car to continue, I got out and met Gopal, the man who ran the guest house. I jumped on the back of his motorbike and rode the rest of the way. Soon enough, the cutest little house, nestled in the rice fields, came into view. This would be my home for the next few days. I was smiling from ear to ear.

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After dropping off my stuff in my room, I explored the house. Gopal, giving me a tour, explained that I was the only guest this week, and that I’d have the whole place to myself. Is this possible? I thought. I’m one lucky girl! The house had a total of three bedrooms, two bathrooms, a sitting room, kitchen, dining room, terrace, and a room that housed the chickens, rabbits, and dog at night. Upon encountering the chickens and their distinct smell, I was instantly taken back to my Mamaw’s farm. This place was perfect, and just what I needed this week- a place to rest, relax, and recharge. Bliss. Perfect bliss.

My room :)

My room 🙂

Sitting room, where I'd blog and read each night

Sitting room, where I blogged and read each night

Gopal was the kindest, gentlest, most giving person I’ve met in a long time. He and I sat and talked about Nepali life a lot during my stay. I learned that electricity in Nepal is shut off 12 hours per day. The guest house had a backup generator that worked most of the time, but most Nepali people couldn’t afford a generator and just had to deal with the regular power cuts. The times were random each day, but I found they were at pretty inopportune times. For instance, there was no electricity from 6am-1pm and from 5-10pm one day. Those seem to be the times you would need electricity. For him and the people of Nepal, it’s just a way of life. I also learned that the average Nepali family income is 8,000-15,000 Nepali Rupees per month (80-150 USD). That’s it. To say they live in poverty would be an understatement. I learned that in order to give your children the opportunity to succeed in Nepal, they must attend a private school. People who graduate from local schools are unable to get jobs since they have a reputation for being so bad. Sending a child to a private school costs 25 USD per child per month. Gopal sends his three children to private school. Because of this, he and his family all share one room in a shared house with 6 other families.

Gopal and his family :)

Gopal and his family 🙂

Speaking of his children, I had the pleasure of meeting this little guy on my first day. Madan, the most adorable four-year-old around, was instantly taken with me, curious about who I was, following me around, both of us communicating in broken English and hand signals. I introduced him to my iPad, which he’d never seen. After demonstrating a game, he would try it on his own right away. He did very well! He’s so bright.

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The next day, I awoke to the pitter patter of little feet. Opening the door to my room, I find Madan proudly showing off his 3-day old pet rabbit. How cute is that?

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While I spent a lot of time enjoying the peace and quiet of the house, reading on the terrace, blogging in the sitting room, playing with the kids, and talking with Gopal, I also spent some time each day exploring the areas in and around the guest house. I went for a walk with Dehli, the dog, one evening at sunset. I came upon a small group of high school kids playing volleyball without a net. Saying hi, they smiled and introduced themselves. After talking with me for a few minutes, they invited me to play with them, to which I happily joined and had a lot of fun! Gopal took me on a couple of day trips to surrounding villages, where we’d get off the bike and wander around, stopping in to look at the goods for sale and talk with the locals, who were very much drawn to me, the blonde haired girl who looked very different from them. I met some 11 year-old girls who later walked by the house to share some peas they’d picked for me. Even though I was only there three nights, I felt like a part of the community. Wandering around the villages, I found kids playing soccer, table tennis, and tag. My heart was so happy as I caught a glimpse of a life so different than mine.

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My favorite day was my last day there. Gopal and I toured the entire perimeter of Kathmandu Valley on his motorbike, winding through narrow pathways, high into the hills, and down into the valley. We stopped frequently to take in the beauty of the valley, have a Coke with the locals, watch ladies harvest wheat and mustard, talk to some kids, buy a souvenir, and cross a huge bridge connecting two hills/mountains. I managed to get a sunburn despite my 50 SPF sunscreen, but it was totally worth it. The breathtaking beauty of Nepal is truly indescribable. You just have to see it for yourself. And when you do, stay at The Little House in the Rice Fields. Tell Gopal I sent you!

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