The Little House in the Rice Fields

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The view from the terrace. I couldn’t get enough!

As you know, I’ve recently returned from a trip to Nepal. I was only there for five days, so I just stayed in and around Kathmandu, the nation’s capital. Kathmandu was alright. It was a busy city with lots going on and much to see, but I live in a big city with a lot happening, so I wanted to experience something a little different. I wanted to see what real Nepal was like. And I did just that…

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My taxi took me outside of town, past the noise, past the shops, past the chaos. We ended up driving down an old dirt road that wound around houses, up and down hills, past an orphanage. When the road was too bumpy for the car to continue, I got out and met Gopal, the man who ran the guest house. I jumped on the back of his motorbike and rode the rest of the way. Soon enough, the cutest little house, nestled in the rice fields, came into view. This would be my home for the next few days. I was smiling from ear to ear.

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After dropping off my stuff in my room, I explored the house. Gopal, giving me a tour, explained that I was the only guest this week, and that I’d have the whole place to myself. Is this possible? I thought. I’m one lucky girl! The house had a total of three bedrooms, two bathrooms, a sitting room, kitchen, dining room, terrace, and a room that housed the chickens, rabbits, and dog at night. Upon encountering the chickens and their distinct smell, I was instantly taken back to my Mamaw’s farm. This place was perfect, and just what I needed this week- a place to rest, relax, and recharge. Bliss. Perfect bliss.

My room :)

My room 🙂

Sitting room, where I'd blog and read each night

Sitting room, where I blogged and read each night

Gopal was the kindest, gentlest, most giving person I’ve met in a long time. He and I sat and talked about Nepali life a lot during my stay. I learned that electricity in Nepal is shut off 12 hours per day. The guest house had a backup generator that worked most of the time, but most Nepali people couldn’t afford a generator and just had to deal with the regular power cuts. The times were random each day, but I found they were at pretty inopportune times. For instance, there was no electricity from 6am-1pm and from 5-10pm one day. Those seem to be the times you would need electricity. For him and the people of Nepal, it’s just a way of life. I also learned that the average Nepali family income is 8,000-15,000 Nepali Rupees per month (80-150 USD). That’s it. To say they live in poverty would be an understatement. I learned that in order to give your children the opportunity to succeed in Nepal, they must attend a private school. People who graduate from local schools are unable to get jobs since they have a reputation for being so bad. Sending a child to a private school costs 25 USD per child per month. Gopal sends his three children to private school. Because of this, he and his family all share one room in a shared house with 6 other families.

Gopal and his family :)

Gopal and his family 🙂

Speaking of his children, I had the pleasure of meeting this little guy on my first day. Madan, the most adorable four-year-old around, was instantly taken with me, curious about who I was, following me around, both of us communicating in broken English and hand signals. I introduced him to my iPad, which he’d never seen. After demonstrating a game, he would try it on his own right away. He did very well! He’s so bright.

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The next day, I awoke to the pitter patter of little feet. Opening the door to my room, I find Madan proudly showing off his 3-day old pet rabbit. How cute is that?

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While I spent a lot of time enjoying the peace and quiet of the house, reading on the terrace, blogging in the sitting room, playing with the kids, and talking with Gopal, I also spent some time each day exploring the areas in and around the guest house. I went for a walk with Dehli, the dog, one evening at sunset. I came upon a small group of high school kids playing volleyball without a net. Saying hi, they smiled and introduced themselves. After talking with me for a few minutes, they invited me to play with them, to which I happily joined and had a lot of fun! Gopal took me on a couple of day trips to surrounding villages, where we’d get off the bike and wander around, stopping in to look at the goods for sale and talk with the locals, who were very much drawn to me, the blonde haired girl who looked very different from them. I met some 11 year-old girls who later walked by the house to share some peas they’d picked for me. Even though I was only there three nights, I felt like a part of the community. Wandering around the villages, I found kids playing soccer, table tennis, and tag. My heart was so happy as I caught a glimpse of a life so different than mine.

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My favorite day was my last day there. Gopal and I toured the entire perimeter of Kathmandu Valley on his motorbike, winding through narrow pathways, high into the hills, and down into the valley. We stopped frequently to take in the beauty of the valley, have a Coke with the locals, watch ladies harvest wheat and mustard, talk to some kids, buy a souvenir, and cross a huge bridge connecting two hills/mountains. I managed to get a sunburn despite my 50 SPF sunscreen, but it was totally worth it. The breathtaking beauty of Nepal is truly indescribable. You just have to see it for yourself. And when you do, stay at The Little House in the Rice Fields. Tell Gopal I sent you!

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15 thoughts on “The Little House in the Rice Fields

  1. elsie

    What an incredible spring break you had! When you are a part of a community that has so many needs, but yet they are happy and surviving, it make you take a step back to assess all the riches within your life.

    Reply
  2. Haddon Musings

    Thank you for sharing your visit to Nepal. It sounds and looks like a wonderful, enriching experience.

    Reply
  3. arlsvera

    Your trip sounds delightful. I love that you got out of the city and explored the countryside. It’s fantastic to spend time with the locals — it sounds like you had a really authentic experience.

    Reply
  4. isbergamanda

    I love the shot of Madan with his pet bunny!

    I have a friend who teaches at the international school in Katmandu and she has mentioned the rolling blackouts, but not how long they were! Wow.

    Thanks for sharing your experience. It sounds like you had a peaceful vacation.

    Reply
    1. aggiekesler Post author

      Thanks! He is the cutest little thing, isn’t he? I would have a hard time with the blackouts I think. And yes, peaceful is the right word…:)

      Reply

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